Free 20 minute Health and Wellness Coaching Session

I started this blog a few years ago as an outlet for myself to grow and heal, and to help people living with chronic pain thrive intead of withering.

That’s where the journey started. But it didn’t end there. I have completed one life coaching course and now I am taking a second coaching course to specifically work with people living with chronic pain but also within the scope of anything relating to health and wellness.

Now, I am a health and wellness coaching student at the Take Courage Coaching U© and I need your help to complete specific requirements to become a Nationally Board Certified Health and Wellness Coach

I am required to complete a total of 50 twenty minute coaching sessions by the end of October to take the exam in February 2021.  I am asking your help to accomplish this goal. 

I am reaching out to offer FREE 20 minutes session surrounding any health and wellness challenges including, but not limited to, pain, diet and nutrition, weight loss, sleep, diabetes.


WHAT IS HEALTH & WELLNESS COACHING AND ITS BENEFITS

What I can and cannot do for you is listed here. 

The benefits of working with a certified health and wellness coach are listed here.

Go to www.chronicpainlifecoaching.com and scroll down to Testimonials from previous clients with proven results.


I am offering FREE 20 minute sessions to coach your toughest challenges surrounding any type of change you would like to make in your life but have found it too hard to accomplish on your own. My expertise is with chronic pain but any topic or goal is appropriate for these free sessions.


If you ARE NOT INTERESTED in participating, would you be willing to forward this email to 5 people right now that you believe would be interested. 


Thank you for the opportunity to serve you while I make my dream come true of making health and wellness coaching a standard practice of care for people living with chronic pain.

Please contact me with any questions or concerns.
Cindy

chronicpainlifecoaching@gmail.com

ChronicPainLifeCoaching.com

Important Skills Your Need While Living With Chronic Pain

What is your first thought and action when you face a large obstacle like chronic pain?
  • Are you frustrated due to being unable to be active in the things you love?
  • Do you become angry about your circumstances?
  • Are you afraid for your future?

Frustration, anger, and fear.

While I do not believe that pain can be “thought away,” research shows that living with strong negative emotions keep us locked in the chronic “pain brain.”
 
They keep our brain “sensitive” to pain.
 
Our thoughts and emotions are part of our pain experience and are linked to brain activities that can increase or decrease sensitivity to pain signals throughout our bodies.
 
How do we face an obstacle like chronic pain while calming down this sensitive pain brain?
 
In the sports world, there is something called “The Process.” It’s a philosophy created by the University of Alabama coach Nich Saban, who taught his players to ignore the big picture and focus instead on doing the absolutely smallest thing well.
 
Focus less on important games, winning championships, and the opponent’s enormous lead.
Focus more on practicing with full effort, finishing a specific play, and converting on a single possession.
 
Focusing on and mastering one specific skill that lasts seconds and building other skills upon that foundation helps world-class athletes win at their sport. A season can last months, a game can last hours, but a single play takes seconds.
 
Following “The Process” when you live with chronic pain means utilizing and mastering small skills you have available in your Chronic Pain Self-Management Toolbox. Each tool is a “single play” to practice until mastered like world-class athletes.
 
A recent tool highlighted in the Chronic Pain Life Coaching toolbox series explained how Pacing can help you meet your goals on a regular basis, not the typical, too much activity leading to too much inactivity that creates a vicious cycle. Pacing is a foundational tool everyone living with chronic pain should utilize.
 

Five Steps To Being Better At Pacing When You Live With Chronic Pain

If you have had chronic pain very long you know about having “good days” and having “bad days.”

Good days are when our plans run according to our schedule and we happily go about our day checking things off of our list. Bad days generally mean how much the pain gets in the way of daily activities and frustrates our plans.
Multiple bad days in a row can leave you struggling to complete even the simplest of tasks such as daily hygiene. Sometimes bad days can even affect showering and brushing teeth.
So, how do we keep the “bad days” away? It is a really simple idea but sometimes hard to manage for complex reasons individual to each person, but learning to pace yourself is a good tool to start with when living with chronic pain.
Even though I am positive pacing should always be the main tool in everyone’s Chronic Pain SELF-Management Toolbox (free printable below) , I struggle myself with pacing my own activities. And I, like most, pay for it with many days of accomplishing little in the life I want to live.
So, join me in resolving to do better at pacing daily activities because without pacing yourself, the good days can slowly disappear beyond recognition without some thoughtful intervening.
So, let’s think about pacing as a tool in our Chronic Pain Self-Management Toolbox. These types of tools are always available to us and cost nothing. What does it mean to pace yourself if you have chronic pain?
  • · Effective pacing yourself means that YOU, rather than your pain, decide how your day is planned.
  • · Effective pacing allows you to accomplish some activities every day instead of one “good” day and multiple “bad” days.

Pacing, in short, is taking a break BEFORE you need it throughout the day.

Becoming aware of our pain and how, when, and what it takes to escalate it to debilitating levels will aide in utilizing pacing as a tool. Here are a few steps to begin pacing your activities as a tool for self-care and self-pain management.

1. First, let’s check-in.

We need to have a plan for our day. A critical part of that plan is checking in with our bodies when we live with pain. Set a timer on your phone to remember to check-in if you get too busy. Or, if you already know 2 hours of sitting is your limit, set a timer for 1 ½ hour to eliminate pain overload. Simply take a break from the activity in some way that relaxes you and set a timer for self-care so you get back to work on your task afterward.
 

2. Break things down.

Does a job feel completely overwhelming and out of control? If so, breaking up a large job into smaller tasks will help you accomplish your larger goal. Determine your overall goal then break it down. When you have a list to check off activities you will see that you are accomplishing the things you want to do in life. Remember to take breaks between tasks that are relaxing and refreshing.
 

3. Work slower.

Slow really does win the race for people living with chronic pain. Work at a slower, less intense pace and you will get more done. Be deliberate with your time by investing in a planner. Schedule slower pace time frames with short rests in between.
 

4. Increase time in small increments.

You can add small increments of time to activities to find your stopping point for optimum feel-good days. When you find you overdo it, go back down to the previous time frame for the activity. You will be running at optimum speed in no time.
 

5. Change tasks frequently.

Another really overlooked chronic pain self-management tip is to change your task often and use different parts of the body throughout the day. Be creative throughout your day. Do things on your list that require you to sit for a short duration, then change to standing or walking activities, whatever your abilities allow. Remember to take breaks.
 
TIP: Try not to get in the practice of using your “good days” to play “catch-up” and push yourselves too hard to catch up on all the things you couldn’t do on days when the pain was overwhelming. This can also create a cycle of too much activity and no activity. Beware of this and always pace yourself.
Subscribe to Chronic Pain Life Coaching’s blog to receive a free Pain Self-Management Action Plan printable worksheet. Making an action plan gives you an advantage over your chronic pain. Take back control of your life today with one plan at a time.
Using the free printable form will help you reach your goals faster.

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Changing begins with thinking about what pain is and does in our bodies, not just reacting when the pain is excruciating. Having a reminder of your action plan can help you to be mindful of your daily self-care choices which will, I promise, lead to more “good days” than “bad days.”
I am always available to help you achieve a higher level of well-being and performance in life and work particularly when change is hard. I will help you develop skills and use tools to make sustainable change for the good.
Book a free 30-minute consultation today. This discovery meeting is a chance for us to practice some of our core values: listen, learn, and serve. Let’s get to know each other.

BOOK NOW

Music is My Shorthand

Tonight, I am doing fairly well but there are some out there that are feeling like they just cannot keep going.

If that is you tonight, this video is for you.

If you are doing good, please stop one minute to pray for the people that cannot see their way at this moment.

Chronic pain often forces us to remain isolated and feeling alone. We have all had those moments that makes us fearful of our future.

So tonight, remember that you are not alone.

Much Love & Many Prayers,
Cindy

International Association for Suicide Prevention

Photo by Krystal Ng on Unsplash

Music is the shorthand of emotion.” – Leo Tolstoy quote from BrainyQuote.com

My Temple

Today, I was going through last years datebook and found a prayer that I had shared in a blog last year.  I would like to share it again today.  It’s a great reminder that in all of the mess we can feel gratitude within the stuggles of fighting with a broken earthly body.

Creator God:

Thank you for this body. Thank you for the gift of movement, the gift of touch, the gift of laughter.  When I am at odds with my body, please help me focus my thoughts to what my body can do and the ways it can serve you. Thank you for the nerves and synapses. arterteries, and brain cells, that make me who I am, your creation.  Amen

Enjoy your weekend!

Much Love & Many Prayers,

Cindy

Stop Limiting Beliefs!

This is a great explanation of how the brain reacts to new information. Our brains are lazy, but we can change gears with constant reminders of the two solutions he mentions. Really helpful read.

Pointless Overthinking

As you may or may not know, a limiting belief is any belief of yourself where you believe you cannot do or achieve something.

For example:

I can’t do well at at this project because of my boss hating me.

I can never start a successful business because my family has always failed at starting their own business.

I won’t go to the gym, because I’ll look like an fat old slob and people will laugh at me.

You get the point. Most, if not, all of us have had these beliefs before.

And the annoying thing about them is that they simply hold us back from something we secretly want to do, sometimes even dream of doing, and always sort make us suppress our desires. Terrible.

So what can you do about them?

I’ll give you two pieces of advice. Two pieces that have helped me breakthrough limiting beliefs.

View original post 271 more words

Reinventing The Wheel

Sometimes hubby and I go to a motocross track on the weekend. Hubby races a sports quad, and I really enjoy going too because I grew up around fast cars because of my brothers. I am familiar with the noise and the smells. My dad owned a shop for car repairs, so it was something I was always around. The smell of grease and oil actually reminds me of good memories and that has continued with my hubby.

When we first started going to the track, I was in much better health. Traveling to the motocross tracks was easy, and I could run from jump to jump watching them ride. Since my pain level has increased, we’ve had to improvise.

Hubby brings a generator so I can plug in my heating pad. I have sat in 90-degree heat with it against my back. On the sweltering days, he brings a powerful fan that everyone enjoys. We have a pretty good set up. I know how lucky I am that he helps me to be as comfortable as possible.

The obstacles have been worked out so I can enjoy being there even though I have chronic pain. Hubby loads up all my extra bags of needed items for the trip. I will decide when to take medication or apply a patch, so it is all working together for the most extended moments of pain coverage during the trip and watching him race.

Before chronic pain, I made videos of the guys riding which I really enjoyed doing. Now, I video from a stationary position because I cannot run around the track anymore.

Everything in my life had to change to accommodate my illnesses and going to the track was one of them. At first, I fought it. I wanted life to be like it always had been for me, no struggle to do the things I love.

I am a creature of habit, so I am not too fond of change, but I needed to reinvent myself. I was tired of grieving my old life or the life that I thought I should have. I was profoundly depressed and full of anxiety, and I decided I needed to change. I am learning to reinvent the activities I love by finding solutions to each problem I faced. It’s been two years since I started the process of determining what I needed to do to have a fulfilling life even with chronic pain. Bottom line: I have to accept it.

You may cringe when I mention acceptance of pain. Change is hard, and many people think if you accept your pain, you give up, but it does not have to be that way.

Acceptance is only accepting that you need to make changes to your life.  That is all you agree to. You need to look at it differently and get creative.  If life gives you lemons, make lemonade!

This is accomplished by learning new ways to do things you love to do.  The activity may not be exactly the same, but the passion will be there.  You just have to look for it.

Life is messy and painful. It is so hard for me to accept that, but that is what we must understand when living with chronic pain. Reinventing yourself or your activities will not make it easier, but it can resemble the life you had before.

I encourage you to take an inventory of what you loved to do in the past that you can no longer do because of your illness. Break down each problem by finding solutions one by one, then you will reinvent your life.

Much Love & Many Prayers,

Cindy

Photo credit: Cindy

Words For Healing

I have missed writing, but when I am doing advocacy work, I seem to fall in head first and get lost. It seems like everything is urgent because it takes so long to finally see the results of your hard work.  You can hardly tell that you are making any difference. It really is hard work to go in with credible information.  I applaud anyone that has made the trip to visit their elected officials and given them an education on what the chronic pain community is going through these days.

I have taken to twitter encouraging everyone in the chronic pain community to get their voices heard by reaching out to their legislators.  I had a few people that said they were too scared to speak out because of retribution, ie: they will lose access to the small amount of medicine that they need to be able to function.

I completely understand the fear in speaking out. I feel the same. Knowing that people are afraid to speak out compels me to be the voice for them also.  For someone that has no other legal and affordable options than their current opioid medications, it must be agonizing everyday counting their pills and worrying if this is the last bottle before the pain is unbearable. That breaks my heart.

If you decide to go to your representative, here’s a link to find out who you should contact and how to reach them.  If you want more information about advocating for the chronic pain community, contact me. There is plenty that can be done from home.

I also began a writing group last week.  There are about 8 of us and we are made up of 8 different perspectives, so I’m loving that.  So, far it has been mostly timed free flowing writing. I’m excited to see what the future groups will hold.  We are all looking for different things from the group.

I am thankful for the gift of writing.  Being about to express myself through words is healing.  I know most of you that are reading are writers also.  Do you stick to one style of writing or do you use different mediums – free write, poetry, prose, spiritual, song lyrics, blog post- to convey your feelings?

I believe that what every you write, whether it’s a tweet or a post, you should edify others. Honor them.  I am appauld by the comments I read on twitter and facebook; the unnecessary meanness in the words people type anonymously behind their computer screen. I do not understand why people are so mean.

But let’s be different.  Today, make a positive tweet about your life with your chronic illness.  Publish a uplifting post about another’s triumph over struggle.  Just put some love out there to combat the hate.

Much Love & Many Prayers,

Cindy

 

 

 

 

A Drop in the Bucket

I met with someone from my House of Representative’s office yesterday afternoon about how chronic pain affects our lives.

I think it went well. I presented the information in four parts: life with chronic pain after the CDC recommendations, addiction, chronic pain, and suicide, and legislative solutions. He seemed to listen and wrote a few things down.

I have done what I can by having this meeting. What this office does with the information is up to them. I don’t know if I made a difference or not, but I hope that they will remember our meeting when any legislation involving pain and pain research comes up.

I think everyone should do this kind of thing at least once even though it’s not easy to do for someone with a chronic illness. It took me many emails and three months to have the time to put together a notebook of information to leave with their office.

I am not naive thinking this one chat with my Congressman’s office will make an immediate difference. We have an unbelievably tangled mess with the opioids, chronic pain, and why people become addicted. To fix these colliding emergencies will not be easy.

I “put my drop in the bucket,” so to speak. Other people need to do the same, or the bucket will never be filled with individual drops that make it overflow showing a need for action by our government to protect people with pain.

We need to be brave by speaking out, especially about the need for expedited pain research. Everyone might as well get comfortable with the turning tide on opioids. It is not going away.

If anyone wants ideas or information about how to speak to your congressman, please message me. I will be glad to help you make a difference in the chronic pain community.

Much Love and Many Prayers,
Cindy

Photo Credit: jomar-271602-unsplash capital hill

Beautiful People

“The most beautiful people are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have still found their way out of the depths.  These people have an appreciation, a sensitivity, and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, and a deep loving concern.  Beautiful people do not just happen.”      ——Elisabeth Kubler-Ross

We cannot control the things that happen to us, but we can grow through the pain when bad things happen.  There is a purpose, but you cannot see it yet.  He will bring good out of the most difficult situations.

The struggle up the mountain is difficult and challenging, but at the top is a view that is unimaginable.  Keep fighting the fight and win the race.

Overcoming struggles is what make us strong. We weren’t born brave. We develop it through trials, and sometimes those trials seem so unfair.  I always try to remember this is not the world that God intended for us.

Rest in knowing you are being transformed. Every defeat that brought you down, the suffering that made you feel weak, the struggles to get through each day, and every loss that broke your heart will be used for good.

Who can you reach out to today with compassion and help them on their journey and bring beauty from your pain by helping others with your own experiences?

I hope you will do that this week because everyone needs to hear the encouraging, “You got this.”

“You never know how strong you are until being strong is your only choice.”
—-Bob Marley

Much Love & Many Prayers,

Cindy